AKA Respect

4-12-2014 been in humi since 3-15-2014

AKA Respect Anchors Aweigh (4.5 x 52)

Wrapper: Ecuadorian Habano

Binder: Honduran Corojo Ligero

Filler: Dominican Corojo Ligero, Honduran Corojo Ligero

The Respect line of cigars is a line specifically made to honor all branches of the US military. Each vitola actually represents a different branch of the military. This particular vitola is to honor the navy. Every branch is included and there are also vitolas to honor those who have fallen. A percentage of sales go to the Wounded Warrior Project and the company supports CigarsForWarriors.net.

This line of cigars has two different blends. This is because the line was reblended in 2013. The specimen under review here is the original blend with the Ecuadorian Habano and not the new blend with a Criollo wrapper. The New wrapper came about because the company ran out of old wrapper. Rather than reblend the cigar without telling anyone, AKA was truthful and honest. Respect is not just for the military, but also the people spending their hard earned money on a cigar.

With the reblend of the line there also came new sizes. The 4.5 x 52 version of the Anchors Aweigh went away and was replaced with the 6.5 x 54 version. The old blend is a bolder blend, where as the new blend is more designed for refinement.

Both the old and new blends have tobaccos from two of the biggest names in cigar tobacco around. There is Dominican tobacco from the Kelner farms and there is true corojo leaf from the Honduran farms of Eiroa.

Looking at the AKA respect, the first thing to pop out is the striking high contrast double band. Bot bands are silver and black. The main band only reads “AKA” and the secondary band is the name of the cigar. In true American form, it is bold. The cigar itself is very dark. Save from one giant vein running down the entire side, the cigar is very smooth and it has an oily sheen. The large ring and short length of the cigar give it a very stout look.

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In the hand the cigar feels firm and oily. The smell is a very heavy barnyard and earth. A lick on the cap is slightly sweet. This sweet fades to a mild spice. The cut is with a double guillotine. The firm draw is coco and very mildly rye bread.

A light with a soft flame brings on initial puffs of cedar and damp earth. The cedar is a touch musky and lightly bitter. Through the nose there is more of the cedar musk and a bit of spice. As the cigar settles in the bitter goes away and the cedar through the nose becomes a bit pungent. It is sharp and a bit over done. The earth undertones on the palate keep it from being a real problem. A mild spice lingers on the palate after the smoke is expelled. Though slightly out of balance, the mouth coating flavors make the mouth water. This keeps things interesting and inspire further puffing.

The mid point has a much more subtle feel. The flavors are all there just much more mild and balanced. A slight sweetness develops, but it is not heavy handed. There is little in the way of complexity but the flavors that are there are nice. The finish is a bit long but it is only sweet earth and not very oppressive.

The final third does not develop much more. As strange as this may seem, this is a good thing. Many cigars tend to get hot or harsh in the final third. This one does not. It stays smooth. It stays manageable, and therefor, enjoyable; perfect for sitting around a fire pit with friends making good use of the freedom of speech.

Burn to the burn

time 1 hour 45 min

burn: 9
draw: 9
taste: 8
aftertaste: 8
construction: 10
balance: 8
feel: 9

overall: 8.7

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~ by kuzi16 on April 11, 2014.

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